Adapted Books in Autism Units

Wanting to add more and meaningful activities to your classroom?

Have you tried adapted books?

Learn more about using adapted books in Autism Units!

Using Adapted Books in Autism Units

I love adapted books. LOVE! They are one of my favorite tools in Autism classrooms. When it comes to working on basic skills, advanced concepts, content area ideas, or even personal information, adapted books are a great way to effectively target specific skills in a way that is engaging for students.

Using adapted books in Autism Units. How and Why PLUS get some FREE!

Are you looking for a cheap and easy alternative to laminating pouches? We’ve got 5 laminating hacks for teachers plus a bonus you can find in your kitchen!

Laminating Hacks for Teachers

Are you looking for a cheap and easy alternative to laminating pouches? We’ve got 5 laminating hacks for teachers plus a bonus you can find in your kitchen!

Are you looking for a cheap and easy alternative to laminating pouches? We’ve got 5 laminating hacks for teachers plus a bonus you can find in your kitchen!

Laminating Hacks for Teachers

It was horrifying. I looked everywhere. I looked in all my drawers, my supply closet, and my secret stash hiding spot- there were no laminating sheets anywhere. I am a member of Amazon Prime, so I sat down to log on and order more. I figured I could wait the two days. But, man, it’s hard to be without.

 

I decided to brainstorm and try some standard laminator and laminating sheet alternatives and I must say, I liked a couple of these more than the old sheet way! Either way, I know you are a laminating-addict… we need to be with our students. Our materials are strategically modified and mean to be reusable, but are not always treated with the best of care (read: put in mouths, thrown, ripped, and more).

 

Try these alternatives and see what you think… I can tell you they really work!

6 Mistakes Autism Unit Teachers and Paras Make

6 Mistakes Autism Unit Teachers and Paras Make…

Do you do any of these? STOP!

6 Mistakes Teacher in Autism Units Make from NoodleNook1

Working with students in self-contained settings or those with severe or multiple disabilities is hard, but I see many people in the classroom make these same mistakes over and over without really thinking there are any consequences. If you stop these 6 mistakes, your students will be the better for it- I promise!

Autism Classroom Setup

Autism Classroom Setup: 10 Things Every Autism Classroom Teacher Needs from Amazon

The other day I was walking in Wal-Mart and I was so sad to see back to school stuff! Fourth of July picnic and party supplies are not even on final clearance yet… why are they reminding me that school will be back in session before I can even toast my buns on the grill and down my summer adult beverage.

The one thing that does satisfy my summer relaxation and obsession with school perfection is shopping for school supplies. I have even taken to letting my kids order their school stuff on Amazon as opposed to schlep the whole crew to the store and fight the impulse buys and the marker boxes that are not exactly what was on the back to school list. They like it and with my Amazon Prime subscription, it comes to my house shipping-free and hassle-free.

This year is the first time I will order my back to school essentials from Amazon as well. With all the browsing and price comparison, I thought I’d share my order top 10 so you can see what I think are essentials for every teacher in Autism Units or Self-Contained settings.

Autism Classroom Setup: These are the 10 things every Autism Classroom Teacher Needs from Amazon. Yeah, you’ll love number 11!

6 Real and actionable ways to start the year off right in Autism units or self-contained.

Start the Year Off Right

6 Ways to Start the Year off Right When Teaching Students With Multiple Disabilities

It seems like summer just started, but the awesomest of you are already thinking about school starting- you’re mentally planning, curating materials, and your inner Rock Star teacher is rejuvenating. I’m teaching summer school for the severely disabled this year and some of my aides will be starting as teachers in the fall. The one question they really want to know is what they can do right to start the year off right.

With that in mind, here is a list of 6 ways to start the year off right when teaching LIFE Skills/PMLD.

Start Year Off Right in Self Contained Autism Units

Seeing regression in students with significant disabilities is heartbreaking… but how do you keep them engaged and learning over the summer? Here are the 3 best websites to stop summer regression!

Best Websites to Stop Summer Regression

Seeing regression in students with significant disabilities is heartbreaking… but how do you keep them engaged and learning over the summer? Here are the 3 best websites to stop summer regression!

Seeing regression in students with significant disabilities is heartbreaking… but how do you keep them engaged and learning over the summer? Here are the 3 best websites to stop summer regression!

Best Websites to Stop Summer Regression

The countdowns are posted in classrooms. Teachers are dreaming of days with no alarm clocks. Students are fantasizing about the pool, late bedtimes, and summer fun.

Yes, summer is coming.

Problem with students who have significant disabilities is that summer often means regression and when students take so long to recoup that summer slide, isn’t our responsibility to do something?

No worries. I have 3 great websites that are FREE, FUN, and EASY to assign as the teacher as well as TRACK DATA!

Yeah. It’s all that, so read on!

The Supreme Court found that we need to do more than de minimis… but what does that even mean? 5 Ways to Guarantee you’re more than minimus!

IEP De Minimis

The Supreme Court found that we need to do more than de minimis… but what does that even mean?

5 Ways to Guarantee you’re more than minimus to keep your IEPs out of court!

iep de minimis

The Supreme Court found that we need to do more than de minimis… but what does that even mean? 5 Ways to Guarantee you’re more than minimus!

Supreme Court Ruling in a Nutshell

Several federal laws established how we educate students with significant disabilities. That includes IDEA (the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act) and FAPE (Free Appropriate Public Education). The United States Supreme Court heard the Endrew F. vs. Douglas County School District case and ruled providing FAPE requires we “enable the child to make progress appropriate in light of his circumstance”.

That, my friend, is as clear as mud. I have heard campus administrators, classroom teachers, and parents of students with disabilities all talking about how this ruling will revolutionize how we educate students with significant disabilities. I, however, am not sure there will be much of a change.

In order to shed some light on the subject, let’s break this down.

All your IEP meetings coming due at the same time? Not sure where to start or where to go? An IEP Goal Bank for Autism Units, LID and PMLD can help light the tunnel!

IEP Goal Bank for Autism

IEP Goal Bank for Autism Units, LID, or PMLD

I have been there. I really have. You are sitting in front of a computer screen tasked with writing IEP goals for a student. You sit there, glazed over, wondering what to write.

And it’s not that you don’t know your students. It’s not that you’re unable to write good IEP goals. The thing is you’re just not sure where they should go next. Once them master a goal, what is the logical next step?

 

All your IEP meetings coming due at the same time? Not sure where to start or where to go? An IEP Goal Bank for Autism Units, LID and PMLD can help light the tunnel!

Ever wonder about instructional text versus grade level text when teaching literacy to students with Autism and significant disabilities? We have some answers!

Teaching Literacy to Students with Autism

Teaching Literacy to Students with Autism

I read a lot… I wish I had time to read more! I recently read an article about instructional level text as a tool to improve reading. This has always been something that has bothered me. Teachers have long believed that the only text appropriate for older students who happened to be low readers is instructional level text. In other words, text that corresponds with their assessed reading level. I have always thought otherwise. When you get to students in middle and high school, presenting only instructional level text limits a student’s exposure to challenging materials and also throttles their learning. So what does that mean when you’re teaching literacy to students with Autism and significant disabilities?

Ever wonder about instructional text versus grade level text when teaching literacy to students with Autism and significant disabilities? We have some answers!

Dora in High School

It never fails, at least once a school year I walk into a high school classroom and see an almost adult reading a Dora or Barney book.

 

It literally makes me groan.

 

What would make anyone think a 17-year-old would want to read a Dora book? Whenever I talk about it with the teacher, the reaction is always the same. The student is reading a book that is appropriate for their “instructional reading level”.

It sounds very formal, and almost convincing… But truth be told, teachers have been holding on to the idea of instructional level text for so long- does it really apply when you’re teaching literacy to students with Autism or other significant disabilities?

 

Personally, I don’t think so.

Ever wonder about instructional text versus grade level text when teaching literacy to students with Autism and significant disabilities? We have some answers!